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2019 Canadian Federal Election

What is it?

An election that allows Canadians to pick members of the House of Commons. These individuals are known as Members of Parliament (MPs). The House of Commons dominates parliamentary government in Canada as it the House who chooses the Prime Minister of Canada, proposes and passes new laws.

Elections Step-By-Step (Put Together by Elections Canada)

1. Dissolution

The governor-general ends Parliament on the request of the prime minister and directs the Chief Electoral Officer to issue the writs of election. The writ is the official paperwork that launches an election in each riding.

2. Candidates

Once an election is called, each party decides who its candidate will be in each riding. A candidate can also run for election without a party, as either “independent” or “no affiliation.”

3. Campaigning

During the campaign period, candidates try to convince voters that they are the best choice to represent them in Parliament.

4. Voting

The most common way to vote is at the polls on election day. Electors must prove their identity and address before getting a ballot. They then go behind a voting screen to privately mark their ballot. Election workers must follow strict procedures to ensure the secrecy of the vote.

5. Counting

Once the polling stations close, election workers open the ballot boxes and count the ballots. The candidate who receives the most votes becomes the member of Parliament (MP) for that riding and represents it in the House of Commons. The political party that has the most MPs usually forms the government. The leader of the political party with the most members normally becomes the prime minister of Canada.

When is it?

October 21, 2019

What should I know?

Registered Political Parties

For information about registered Canadian political parties and their platforms, click https://www.elections.ca/content.aspx?section=pol&dir=par&document=index&lang=e

Voting

Elections Canada offers a Voter Information Service that allows you to look up all of the information you need to know about your electoral district. This includes locations of advance and election day poll stations, a list of candidates, and more. Access this via https://www.elections.ca/scripts/vis/FindED?L=e&PAGEID=20

You can make things easiest by bringing a piece of government identification with a photo. If you don't have this form of identification you have a lot of other options including a bank statement, a credit card, a public transportation card, a student identity card, a CNIB card, e-statements, e-invoices, etc.
See https://elections.ca/content.aspx?section=vot&dir=ids&document=index&lang=e for a full list of examples.

There's more than one way to vote!

1. Vote on election day - October 21 from 9:30 am - 9:30 pm

2. Vote at your advance poll - October 11-14 from 9 am-9 pm

3. Vote at your local Elections Canada Office - vote before October 15 at 6:00 pm

4. Vote by Mail - vote before October 15 at 6:00 pm

*Note: You must be registered to vote. You can register online at www.elections.ca or you can register at your polling station right before you vote.


We want to hear from you!

Be sure to monitor this page, contribute to our polls, and share your questions related to voting in this year's federal election. We will do our best to respond to requests for non-partisan information.

2019 Canadian Federal Election

What is it?

An election that allows Canadians to pick members of the House of Commons. These individuals are known as Members of Parliament (MPs). The House of Commons dominates parliamentary government in Canada as it the House who chooses the Prime Minister of Canada, proposes and passes new laws.

Elections Step-By-Step (Put Together by Elections Canada)

1. Dissolution

The governor-general ends Parliament on the request of the prime minister and directs the Chief Electoral Officer to issue the writs of election. The writ is the official paperwork that launches an election in each riding.

2. Candidates

Once an election is called, each party decides who its candidate will be in each riding. A candidate can also run for election without a party, as either “independent” or “no affiliation.”

3. Campaigning

During the campaign period, candidates try to convince voters that they are the best choice to represent them in Parliament.

4. Voting

The most common way to vote is at the polls on election day. Electors must prove their identity and address before getting a ballot. They then go behind a voting screen to privately mark their ballot. Election workers must follow strict procedures to ensure the secrecy of the vote.

5. Counting

Once the polling stations close, election workers open the ballot boxes and count the ballots. The candidate who receives the most votes becomes the member of Parliament (MP) for that riding and represents it in the House of Commons. The political party that has the most MPs usually forms the government. The leader of the political party with the most members normally becomes the prime minister of Canada.

When is it?

October 21, 2019

What should I know?

Registered Political Parties

For information about registered Canadian political parties and their platforms, click https://www.elections.ca/content.aspx?section=pol&dir=par&document=index&lang=e

Voting

Elections Canada offers a Voter Information Service that allows you to look up all of the information you need to know about your electoral district. This includes locations of advance and election day poll stations, a list of candidates, and more. Access this via https://www.elections.ca/scripts/vis/FindED?L=e&PAGEID=20

You can make things easiest by bringing a piece of government identification with a photo. If you don't have this form of identification you have a lot of other options including a bank statement, a credit card, a public transportation card, a student identity card, a CNIB card, e-statements, e-invoices, etc.
See https://elections.ca/content.aspx?section=vot&dir=ids&document=index&lang=e for a full list of examples.

There's more than one way to vote!

1. Vote on election day - October 21 from 9:30 am - 9:30 pm

2. Vote at your advance poll - October 11-14 from 9 am-9 pm

3. Vote at your local Elections Canada Office - vote before October 15 at 6:00 pm

4. Vote by Mail - vote before October 15 at 6:00 pm

*Note: You must be registered to vote. You can register online at www.elections.ca or you can register at your polling station right before you vote.


We want to hear from you!

Be sure to monitor this page, contribute to our polls, and share your questions related to voting in this year's federal election. We will do our best to respond to requests for non-partisan information.

CLOSED: This quick poll has concluded.
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