It's Our Vote!

2019 Canadian Federal Election

What is it?

An election that allows Canadians to pick members of the House of Commons. These individuals are known as Members of Parliament (MPs). The House of Commons dominates parliamentary government in Canada as it the House who chooses the Prime Minister of Canada, proposes and passes new laws.

Elections Step-By-Step (Put Together by Elections Canada)

1. Dissolution

The governor-general ends Parliament on the request of the prime minister and directs the Chief Electoral Officer to issue the writs of election. The writ is the official paperwork that launches an election in each riding.

2. Candidates

Once an election is called, each party decides who its candidate will be in each riding. A candidate can also run for election without a party, as either “independent” or “no affiliation.”

3. Campaigning

During the campaign period, candidates try to convince voters that they are the best choice to represent them in Parliament.

4. Voting

The most common way to vote is at the polls on election day. Electors must prove their identity and address before getting a ballot. They then go behind a voting screen to privately mark their ballot. Election workers must follow strict procedures to ensure the secrecy of the vote.

5. Counting

Once the polling stations close, election workers open the ballot boxes and count the ballots. The candidate who receives the most votes becomes the member of Parliament (MP) for that riding and represents it in the House of Commons. The political party that has the most MPs usually forms the government. The leader of the political party with the most members normally becomes the prime minister of Canada.

When is it?

October 21, 2019

What should I know?

Registered Political Parties

For information about registered Canadian political parties and their platforms, click https://www.elections.ca/content.aspx?section=pol&dir=par&document=index&lang=e

Voting

Elections Canada offers a Voter Information Service that allows you to look up all of the information you need to know about your electoral district. This includes locations of advance and election day poll stations, a list of candidates, and more. Access this via https://www.elections.ca/scripts/vis/FindED?L=e&PAGEID=20

You can make things easiest by bringing a piece of government identification with a photo. If you don't have this form of identification you have a lot of other options including a bank statement, a credit card, a public transportation card, a student identity card, a CNIB card, e-statements, e-invoices, etc.
See https://elections.ca/content.aspx?section=vot&dir=ids&document=index&lang=e for a full list of examples.

There's more than one way to vote!

1. Vote on election day

2. Vote at your advance poll

3. Vote at your local Elections Canada Office

4. Vote by Mail

*Note: You must be registered to vote. You can register online at www.elections.ca or you can register at your polling station right before you vote.

Innisfil ideaLAB & Library Democracy in Action Speaker Series

1. On Thursday, September 12 at 7:00 p.m. Elections Canada visits the Lakeshore Branch of the Library to provide residents with a Federal Election 101 session. Do you have any questions or concerns about exercising your right to vote? Bring them here!
No registration is required.

2. On Thursday, October 3rd at 7:00 p.m. GreenPAC visits the Lakeshore Branch of the Library to host its 100 Debates on the Environment Event.

Do you want to participate in a coast-to-coast conversation about local and national environmental issues? Join us on October 3 for an evening with political leaders from all Canada’s major political parties as they debate how to turn local and national environmental concerns into political action. Topics include: climate change, water pollution, wilderness conservation, and toxic substances. Special guest Deb McGrath will be here to moderate the discussion.

100 Debates on the Environment brings together community groups, non-profits, businesses and individuals who are working to increase the level of environmental leadership in Canada by holding 100 strictly non-partisan all-candidate debates on the environment before the next election. For more information, see https://www.100debates.ca/

3. On Tuesday, October 8 at 7:00 p.m. Canadian author and political activist Dave Meslin visits the Library's Lakeshore Branch to discuss his book Teardown: Rebuilding Democracy from the Ground Up.
Library users can borrow a copy of Meslin's book for free from the Library. Copies will also be available for purchase at the event.

To learn more see https://www.teardown.build/the_book

We want to hear from you!

Be sure to monitor this page, contribute to our polls, and share your questions related to voting in this year's federal election. We will do our best to respond to requests for non-partisan information.

2019 Canadian Federal Election

What is it?

An election that allows Canadians to pick members of the House of Commons. These individuals are known as Members of Parliament (MPs). The House of Commons dominates parliamentary government in Canada as it the House who chooses the Prime Minister of Canada, proposes and passes new laws.

Elections Step-By-Step (Put Together by Elections Canada)

1. Dissolution

The governor-general ends Parliament on the request of the prime minister and directs the Chief Electoral Officer to issue the writs of election. The writ is the official paperwork that launches an election in each riding.

2. Candidates

Once an election is called, each party decides who its candidate will be in each riding. A candidate can also run for election without a party, as either “independent” or “no affiliation.”

3. Campaigning

During the campaign period, candidates try to convince voters that they are the best choice to represent them in Parliament.

4. Voting

The most common way to vote is at the polls on election day. Electors must prove their identity and address before getting a ballot. They then go behind a voting screen to privately mark their ballot. Election workers must follow strict procedures to ensure the secrecy of the vote.

5. Counting

Once the polling stations close, election workers open the ballot boxes and count the ballots. The candidate who receives the most votes becomes the member of Parliament (MP) for that riding and represents it in the House of Commons. The political party that has the most MPs usually forms the government. The leader of the political party with the most members normally becomes the prime minister of Canada.

When is it?

October 21, 2019

What should I know?

Registered Political Parties

For information about registered Canadian political parties and their platforms, click https://www.elections.ca/content.aspx?section=pol&dir=par&document=index&lang=e

Voting

Elections Canada offers a Voter Information Service that allows you to look up all of the information you need to know about your electoral district. This includes locations of advance and election day poll stations, a list of candidates, and more. Access this via https://www.elections.ca/scripts/vis/FindED?L=e&PAGEID=20

You can make things easiest by bringing a piece of government identification with a photo. If you don't have this form of identification you have a lot of other options including a bank statement, a credit card, a public transportation card, a student identity card, a CNIB card, e-statements, e-invoices, etc.
See https://elections.ca/content.aspx?section=vot&dir=ids&document=index&lang=e for a full list of examples.

There's more than one way to vote!

1. Vote on election day

2. Vote at your advance poll

3. Vote at your local Elections Canada Office

4. Vote by Mail

*Note: You must be registered to vote. You can register online at www.elections.ca or you can register at your polling station right before you vote.

Innisfil ideaLAB & Library Democracy in Action Speaker Series

1. On Thursday, September 12 at 7:00 p.m. Elections Canada visits the Lakeshore Branch of the Library to provide residents with a Federal Election 101 session. Do you have any questions or concerns about exercising your right to vote? Bring them here!
No registration is required.

2. On Thursday, October 3rd at 7:00 p.m. GreenPAC visits the Lakeshore Branch of the Library to host its 100 Debates on the Environment Event.

Do you want to participate in a coast-to-coast conversation about local and national environmental issues? Join us on October 3 for an evening with political leaders from all Canada’s major political parties as they debate how to turn local and national environmental concerns into political action. Topics include: climate change, water pollution, wilderness conservation, and toxic substances. Special guest Deb McGrath will be here to moderate the discussion.

100 Debates on the Environment brings together community groups, non-profits, businesses and individuals who are working to increase the level of environmental leadership in Canada by holding 100 strictly non-partisan all-candidate debates on the environment before the next election. For more information, see https://www.100debates.ca/

3. On Tuesday, October 8 at 7:00 p.m. Canadian author and political activist Dave Meslin visits the Library's Lakeshore Branch to discuss his book Teardown: Rebuilding Democracy from the Ground Up.
Library users can borrow a copy of Meslin's book for free from the Library. Copies will also be available for purchase at the event.

To learn more see https://www.teardown.build/the_book

We want to hear from you!

Be sure to monitor this page, contribute to our polls, and share your questions related to voting in this year's federal election. We will do our best to respond to requests for non-partisan information.

You need to be signed in to take this quick poll.

Did you vote in the last federal election?

View Results